August 18, 2007

The Kopper Kettle Inn


My niece got married today and the location of the wedding, and the reception, was The Kopper Kettle Inn in Morristown, IN. I had never been to Morristown before, it's a small town a little south and east of Indy. The Kopper Kettle Inn used to be a grain elevator in the 1800's, and was converted to a Tavern and then a Tea Room. It was a small, but interesting choice for a wedding location -- the patio garden (above) where we sat for the ceremony was beautiful and even my two nephews fighting over the ring-bearer pillow didn't ruin the evening. That's one of the little guys on the left, trying to retrieve a penny from the fountain right behind the bride. The other one was pinned in a choke hold by their mother at this point.

The food was excellent -- like grandma used to make. Baked steak, fried chicken, green beans, corn, mashed potatoes -- all presented in large, heaping service dishes and passed hand to hand by the guests as if it we were having Thanksgiving dinner.

I don't know how many the Inn can seat at once, but there are many rooms and our party of 80 or 100 folks only took up, probably, half the place.

As I waited outside before the Wedding, I shot the breeze with an old man whose wife provides piano music for the regular guests every Saturday night. The whole place has a homey, laid back, family atmosphere. I recommend it, and the traffic around the building made it obvious that many people already know about it.

2 comments:

Sue King said...

Even though I've never eaten at the Kopper Kettle, I'm very familiar with it. When my daughter's father (Bluffton's Rick Miller) and I first moved down here, we lived in Morristown for a while. He still has a sister that lives there. It reminds me of Ossian when I was growing up. Just a sleepy little home town.

Dan McAfee said...

How about that! I used to have cousins who lived just down the road from Morrisville, in Rushville. They lived in an old hotel that had been converted into a home -- spiral staircase, lots of rooms and hiding places, ghosts . . . a great old place.